The Shuffle of Life

A Review of Jill Loree’s Walker by Paul Kluge

When was the last time you looked around in a group setting and thought to yourself, “What am I doing here?” Chances are better than good that you have at some time or other felt like you did not belong.

On the other hand, getting a promotion at work or landing a new job can put us in an intimidating environment, too. Still, we know at some level that all of this is an opportunity, and getting over that creepy feeling will come about. Victory will be ours, we’re kind of pretty sure, aren’t we? But we must trust and be confidant in ourselves, right?

How ‘bout this? Been stuck in a drudge job much? Stuck in a job that saps the good stuff you originally came filled with? You know you have to pay your dues, and you absolutely have to persevere in order to get to that next level and the position you know you were made for and will excel in. What are the chances, do you think, and when will those chances come? Deep breaths.

As Jill’s uncle and sometimes proofreader, I can assure you from firsthand experience that her unpretentious writing style and lacquer-free descriptions are the real deal and a pleasure to peruse.

Or how about the family—the growing-up family—you came from? What is more base than belonging to a family you don’t belong in? Every day a waking up dread, a longing for a daylight that shows no sign of showing itself. Is this family thing the worst of the lot? It may be.

Jill Loree portrays the ‘growing up in the wrong family’ scenario quite handily, while insisting on much-needed reflection and acceptance, all of it filling in as well-after-the-fact comedy sketches. Of course it was not the wrong family, but rather the challenge of the situation to review and recognize the truth in herself, and the opportunity to blossom into an accepting, loving, and developing child of God and the Universe, with still more foibles and head-butts to address. And the path presents itself.

There is every likelihood that Jill Loree’s journey from traumatic childhood to the awakening surprises of adulthood will trip triggers in your own stored memories, well-tended or not.

Uncle Paul

Jill Loree points us toward our own path, while assuring us of the benefits that our continuing reflections and faith offer. Honesty to the quick, along with quick humor, is a style best served with a helping of upbeat, which Jill Loree offers directly. Getting to know Jill Loree through Walker finds her to be an honest and direct 21st-century ‘Yellow Brick Road’ storyteller, pushing us toward where we need to be—eventually and at our own pace.

Her reflected memories may sear us with their all-too-familiar age-of-minority rebellions, casual sex, distasteful bosses reminding us of wicked witches, and the meaningful and not-so-meaningful relationships. Yet, without serving up directives, Jill Loree urges us, through Walker, to live our life fully, confront our fears, and watch for the way that is our way…your way, the only way it can be—for you.

As Jill Loree’s uncle and sometimes proofreader, I can assure you from firsthand experience that her unpretentious writing style and lacquer-free descriptions are the real deal and a pleasure to peruse. You will enjoy the ride of the read, and it just may inspire you to maintain forward, embracing the shuffle of life.

—Uncle Paul

 

WALKER: A Memoir about How I Made a Road

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Get Walker for free (eBook only), for a limited time (download mobi file to read in Kindle app, ePub for iBooks and others).

 

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